Diigo to Edbulogs (weekly)

Posted in Uncategorized. Tags: , . No Comments »

Diigo to Edbulogs (weekly)

Posted in Uncategorized. Tags: , . No Comments »

Diigo to Edbulogs (weekly)

Posted in Uncategorized. Tags: , . No Comments »

Removing the “Other” from my iPhone storage…

Yesterday, I got the black screen of death on my iPhone. That lovely “Connect to iTunes” image usually does not mean the data is salvageable. I had just backed up my photos, and I was looking at the fact that 1/5 of my phone seemed to be used up by “other.” I removed apps, I checked for stored videos, stored emails, internet cache. That’s when the phone went black. I was resigned to have to reset the entire thing. I had been having strange issues, which was why I was trying to figure out what “other” was filling my phone. I tried restoring the iPhone twice, but it stalled out both times. I noticed, though, that 7.1.2 had been released. I’m guessing it was what caused my phone to flutter in the first place.  But, somehow, after unplugging and replugging in the phone three times, the data all returned.  Yet, it still had 1/5 devoted to “other.”

I had a revelation today when I received a voicemail message from my mother. I looked, and I had over 100 stored messages, going back years. Why I hadn’t deleted them, I don’t know. I went through the delete process, but they still remained in a deleted items folder. So, the “other” was still filling my phone. I had to do one more step of clearing the deleted messages completely.  After all of this digging, much of the “other” was these undeleted messages.

Cult of Mac explains the steps really well in this article: Four Ways to Clear Your VoiceMail in iOS 7.

 

What have you found that hogs the memory of your phone or mobile device? How did you fix the issue?

 

Print Friendly
Posted in Cell Phones. No Comments »

Two decades of waiting: Finishing the Giver Quartet, my first Dystopian experience as an educator

Back in April of 2012, I reflected on the popularity of the Dystopian novel  for young readers. This was during the time of the Hunger Games, when adults and young adults alike were fascinated and sucked into the story.

For me, the first real Dystopian novel of my career was The Giver by Lois Lowry. I had read Wrinkle in Time in a literature circle type setting in school. I may have read 1984 or Lord of the Flies in school. Neither of which I remember vividly. The Giver, though, came out in my final years of high school. I don’t remember specifically reading it in school, but by the time it recieved the Newbery in 1994, the book was on a roll. I am pretty sure that it appeared in most of my “modern fiction” courses in my career, as well as in my English Education courses. When I went back to school in the 2000s to get my Middle Level Communications Arts and Literature license, it was part of my courses again.

I loved the book, despite having to read it for classes. Unlike Heart of Darkness, which I struggled through in four classes before I finally saw some merit behind the words.  The Giver had a lot of the elements of what made me so attracted to a book. It had a character who seemed about normal, but had to face abnormal challenges. It was about fitting into a society that wasn’t right, which is a struggle many, many teens face.  I loved the Giver, but the very last page left me with so many questions. I read Lois Lowry’s responses to the frequently asked questions by readers. I had hope that the characters found music and warmth. But, there was no answer. Even reading Gathering Blue and Messenger, I didn’t feel complete. She didn’t mean to write sequels, but those became continuations of the same story.

I heard that Son had been published. I was so busy in the world of iPads, technology, and innovation that I wasn’t taking time to read. I was forgetting the magic that a book can bring.

This week, I reread Giver and Messenger so that I could read Son. (My copy of Gathering Blue is still in a box because of our recent move, and I didn’t have the patience to wait until it was found.)  Reading Son, I found that Lois Lowry did not disappoint. She closed some story lines that I’ve waited literally two decades to understand. Yet, she created a novel that left the reader clinging to every word. With less than ten pages left in the novel, I had no idea how she could pull it all together.

But, Son did not disappoint. While I waited two years from its publication to read it, I feel that the suspense on waiting for the answers was worth two more years. The world that Lois Lowry created, with its intricate communities, prophetic societies, and ultimate hope for the future of humanity (despite human failings)… are worlds beyond compare.  I have finished the Quartet, but unlike twenty years ago when I finished The Giver, I feel complete. I do believe, in part, it is because I am a mother myself that Son resonates the most.

So, for all the young adult readers who embraced The Giver in your formative years, I suggest that you take the time to reread the series and complete the journey started so long ago.

What novel touched you most as a young adult?
Was there a novel that touched you as an educator?
What made these books so powerful in  your memory?

 

 

Print Friendly

So much to do. How to find time to blog?

I have so much to juggle in life. I’m busy chasing around and playing with my two children who are four and six. They sure keep me busy! Once the house has quieted down for the night, usually way past their bedtimes, a long list of items appears on my to do list:

  1. Unpack boxes
  2. Keep the house clean
  3. Get caught up on 10 months of scrapbooking
  4. Exercise
  5. Go to sleep early
  6. Read
  7. Spend time with my husband
  8. Practice Spanish
  9. Prepare for my next conference/work day
  10. Write a blog post

While the list has no specific order of importance, blogging gets lost in the blur of the “everything else” that needs to be done. I answered a question during the Twitter #mnlead chat tonight that my best reflection came the year that I blogged.

The only time that I’ve been successful with blogging was when I did it every. single. day. How can blogging fit into the every day when these other items also need to fit into the daily race?

I guess that the first step is to start small. This is a start, and hopefully, a spark to keep the posts coming through the summer and into the fall.

 

How do other bloggers find the time to get their writing down?

 

Print Friendly
Posted in Reflection. No Comments »

Diigo to Edbulogs (weekly)

Posted in Uncategorized. Tags: , . No Comments »

Diigo to Edbulogs (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

from Blogger http://ift.tt/1kQaiPZ
via IFTTT

Print Friendly
Posted in Uncategorized. Tags: , . No Comments »

Diigo to Edbulogs (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

from Blogger http://ift.tt/1moNPYn
via IFTTT

Print Friendly
Posted in Uncategorized. Tags: , . No Comments »

Diigo to Edbulogs (weekly)

Posted in Uncategorized. Tags: , . No Comments »